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The Poison Ivy League Part 35-An Eventful Election

May 3, 2011

Sulla A’s Presidency ended as it began, in gossip and scandal. When originally running for office, he’d evidently promised not to participate in the college newspaper’s annual elections. Nevertheless, when the time came, he campaigned to be editor-in-chief. Scipio was furious, and Sulla was forced to offer to resign his post if he won the position on “The Crimson.” Jason and Kimel shared a laugh when Scipio offered to step in as President during the interim should Sulla be dismissed. Ultimately, it proved to be a moot point, since Sulla lost the editorial election and retained the Presidency of the debate team, or the few weeks that remained of it, anyway. For new elections were on the horizon. Horatius, Scott, and Sulla C were all running for the highest office.

Kimel had long since decided to ensure that Scott won the election. He believed that his friend’s easy-going and perceptive nature would make him an ideal leader. Perhaps more importantly, Kimel also hoped to reward Scott’s loyalty, for he had not forgotten who had stood up for him against Agrippina and Trimalchio’s slanderous accusations at the previous year’s elections. To carry out his plans, he enlisted the aid of the talktative Porus. Together, they weighed on Sulla A day and night, insisting that Scott would be the best choice to succeed him. Horatius was a non-entity who scarcely debated, they explained. And Scott was much less cocky than Sulla C. He was a calm and cool character, and a fine face for the team to newcomers. Sulla A finally agreed with their assessment, forgetting Sulla C’s equal commitment to HSPDS and the fact that he likely loved the activity more than Scott.

With so much done, Kimel worked on Aemilia and Josephus, winning them over with the promise that Scott’s congeniality would stand in happy contrast to the ambience of the current administration, which was efficient but gloomy. Then, an interview was arranged between Scott and Scipio, which was said to have gone well. On the eve of the election, Kimel was confident that he had successfully paved the way for Scott’s advancement, having learned a great deal over the course of the previous year about the secret workings of oligarchic Governments.

When the night of the election came, the three candidates presented their speeches. Sulla C spoke the most passionately. Scott gave bland but practical answers. Horatius was the most impressive in his delivery. Then the candidates left the room. As planned, Porus opened the floor by providing a strong speech in favor of Scott, which Kimel then echoed and supported. A few novices spoke out for Sulla C, and Kimel, wishing to silence them, put the question to Sulla A, who spoke in favor of Scott.

Then Scipio unexpectedly stepped forward as a strong supporter of Horatius, perhaps simply to oppose Sulla A. Horatius was the most polished speaker, Scipio said, and intuitively seemed like the most natural leader out of the three men. Kimel realized with dread the weight which the former President’s opinion might carry, and so he debated him outright. He insisted that Horatius seldom debated and shouldn’t be rewarded with the highest honors simply because he seemed Presidential in his bearing. Then Porus sarcastically mentioned that Hitler also seemed Presidential in his bearing, and the room erupted into laugher.

Fabius uncharacteristically admitted that he had no opinion. Cynthia spoke in favor of Scott, swayed by Kimel. Voices for Sulla C were effectively drowned out and forgotten. Finally, the matter was put to a vote. The candidates reentered the room. Kimel looked at his friend and shrugged; he had done his best. Then, the announcement was made. Scott was the next President. Kimel was thrilled.

By the end of the night, Arianna was elected as Kimel’s successor. Sulla C was named tournament director, and Petronius the secretary. Horatius was forced to content himself with the position of treasurer.

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